Friday, January 21, 2011

Thank the Shark for this one...



Agent, Janet Reid (AKA: Query Shark), had a post today with notes on her upcoming Writer's Digest Conference (tomorrow). I think they are worth repeating. I thought I knew everything there was to know, but she had a couple of tips that hadn't stuck out to me before. So, here you go... 

Janet: "I'm slated to attend the Writers Digest Conference tomorrow, Saturday, 1/22/11 here in NYC. I'll be on the agents panel in the morning (and trying to keep a civil tongue in my head since I'm sure someone will be live-tweeting!)



In the afternoon I'm leading a workshop on Effective Query Letters. Here's what I'm going to say:

1. Electronic queries are the norm. Pay attention to the DIFFERENCE in format required in e-queries:

a. Address NOT at top


b. Importance of a subject line


c. No cc; no bcc; no "Dear Agent"


2. Single biggest problem in queries is they do not convey what the book is about.


How to fix: Circle EVERY verb in your query letter. Strike out all forms of AM, BE, WAS. What's left? Are they words that convey choice? Conflict? Stakes? If NOT, you'll want to revise


3. Don't waste words or space. Focus on the book. Everything else is secondary.

4. Never apologize for being new. Never apologize for sending me a query. Never apologize for not knowing something. You are not a beggar. Treat yourself and your work with the respect you deserve.



I'm also going to talk about how to pitch when you meet agents face to face, as conference attendees will on Saturday afternoon.

How to Pitch:

1. Don't be afraid. The only agent who will actually eat you is chaperoned, and been warned to behave herself.

2. Tell me three things up front:


a. The novel is finished.


b. the word count is X


c. What category you think it best fits (TWO words at the most here)


3. Tell me the main characters name (if you have a sweeping family saga, or a high fantasy with a gazillion characters pick the main character who appears FIRST in the book), and what choice or decision s/he must make. This takes no more than 25 words.



Then stop talking.



The agent will ask you questions.


You answer them. Keep your answer brief.



DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES do the following:


1. say "let me give you the backstory" or "you need to know this" Focus on the choice the character makes and what happens on page one.

2. Memorize and recite your pitch


3. close your eyes and recite your pitch


4. Don't ramble. Keep your answers short. This is a conversation, not a lecture.


5. Panic. All agents except that sharkly one who is being chaperoned for your protection are very nice people who are glad to see you. Smile and say hello.


I promise, it's just that easy.


If you havn't visited Janet's Query Shark blog, and you are nearing or ready to work on your query, check it out! She has a list of do's and don'ts that are very helpful and you can even submit your query to her for 'critique' before submitting them to the agents on your list. Follow the guidelines, though, because it's hard to get onto her list. You must be very very polished and even then she tears into your query like, well, a shark =).

Note: she doesn't take YA manuscripts for herself, as an agent, but will critique YA MSs.

4 comments:

Ashley said...

I read your paragraph for the contest on Nathan Bransford's Blog. It's really good. One of my faves! Good luck!

Kathryn Packer Roberts said...

Thank you so much! I can't wait to see who he picks. I read some of them, but not all. That was a great idea for a contest.

Kathryn Packer Roberts said...

Thank you so much! I can't wait to see who he picks. I read some of them, but not all. That was a great idea for a contest.

Kathryn Packer Roberts said...

Thank you so much! I can't wait to see who he picks. I read some of them, but not all. That was a great idea for a contest.